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Fundamentals

Debt to Equity Ratio

 

Debt-to-equity ratio

The debt-to-equity ratio (D/E) is a financial ratio indicating the relative proportion of shareholders' equity and debt used to finance a company's assets  It is closely related to leveraging (due to the fact that it leads to more risk), the ratio is also known as Risk, Gearing or Leverage. The two components are often taken from the balance sheet or statement of

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Return on Equity (ROE)

Return on Equity (ROE, Return on average common equity, return on net worth, Return on ordinary shareholders' funds) that measures the rate of return on the ownership interest (i.e., shareholders equity) of the common stock owners. It measures

 

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Stocks with Low Price/Earning Ratios (P/E)

 P/E Ratio ImageThe P/E ratio (price-to-earnings ratio) of a stock (also called its "P/E", "PER", "earnings multiple", or simply "multiple") is a measure of the price paid for a share relative to the annual net income or profit  earned by the firm per share. It is a financial ratio used for valuation: a higher P/E ratio means that investors are paying more for each unit of net income, so the stock is more expensive compared toone with lower P/E ratio. The P/E ratio hasunits of years, which can be interpreted as "number of years of earnings to pay back purchase price", ignoring the time value of money. In other words, P/E ratio shows current investor demand for a company share. The reciprocal of the PE ratio is known as the earnings yield .  The tables below show stocks that are currently trading with a P/E ratio of 11 and below.  

Last update: 12/31/1969 7:00:pm EST

Stocks With Low P/E Ratio


Symbol Company Price P/E

Sorted Descending by P/E (11 or less)


Stocks With Low P/E Ratio


Symbol Company Price P/E

Sorted Descending by P/E (11 or less)


Stocks With Low P/E Ratio


Symbol Company Price P/E

Sorted Descending by P/E (11 or less)



Stocks With Low P/E Ratio


Symbol Company Price P/E

Sorted Descending by P/E (11 or less)



Stocks With Low P/E Ratio


Symbol Company Price P/E

Sorted Descending by P/E (11 or less)


 

Stocks With Low P/E Ratio


Symbol Company Price P/E

Sorted Descending by P/E (11 or less)


Stocks With Low P/E Ratio


Symbol Company Price P/E

Sorted Descending by P/E (11 or less)


 

Stocks With Low P/E Ratio


Symbol Company Price P/E

Sorted Descending by P/E (11 or less)


Stocks With Low P/E Ratio


Symbol Company Price P/E

Sorted Descending by P/E (11 or less)


 

Stocks With Low P/E Ratio


Symbol Company Price P/E

Sorted Descending by P/E (11 or less)


*P/E Ratios and Prices are updated several times during market hours. The last update posted at top of page.

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Earnings Per Share (EPS): What it means to Stocks

 

One of the challenges of evaluating stocks is establishing an “apples to apples” comparison. What I mean by this is setting up a comparison that is meaningful so that the results help you make an investment decision.

 

Similarly, comparing the earnings of one company to another really doesn’t make any sense, if you think about it. Using the raw numbers ignores the fact that the two companies undoubtedly have a different number of  outstanding shares.

For example, companies A and B both earn $100, but company A has 10 shares outstanding, while company B has 50 shares outstanding. Which company’s stock do you want to own?

It makes more sense to look at earnings per share (EPS) for use as a comparison tool. You calculate earnings per share by taking the net earnings and divide by the outstanding shares.

EPS = Net Earnings / Outstanding Shares
Using our example above, Company A had earnings of $100 and 10 shares outstanding, which equals an EPS of 10 ($100 / 10 = 10). Company B had earnings of $100 and 50 shares outstanding, which equals an EPS of 2 ($100 / 50 = 2).

So, you should go buy Company A with an EPS of 10, right? Maybe, but not just on the basis of its EPS. The EPS is helpful in comparing one company to another, assuming they are in the same industry, but it doesn’t tell you whether it’s a good stock to buy or what the market thinks of it. For that information, we need to look at some ratios.

 

 

 

 

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